May 16, 2007

Mow Your Lawn: Buy a Push Reel Lawnmower

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Sometimes it makes sense to get back to basics. A push lawnmower saves gasoline, reduces emissions and noise pollution, and gives you a great workout while keeping your lawn looking green, well-trimmed and lovely.

Scott's 20-inch push reel mower is light and maneuverable, solidly constructed and durable, and at $120, reasonably priced. Has five blades which can be adjusted to nine different grass heights.

Buy Scott's 20-inch Push Reel Lawnmower.

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

April 30, 2007

Bag-E-Wash: Re-Use Plastic Baggies

packaging.jpgPlastic grocery bags have gotten a lot of press lately. San Francisco recently banned them; our own home city of Boston is talking about similar legislation. From our perspective, your best bet is not to use them at all. Invest in an EZ Bag (or a bunch of them, as we recently did).

But what about plastic baggies? They're convenient for storing and transporting food, and they seem more durable than your run-of-the-mill grocery bag. It's hard to eliminate their use completely. We suggest washing and re-using them.

We've written before about the wooden plastic bag dryer, a multi-pronged dowel which allows you to wash and air dry up to 8 plastic bags at a time.

Jeannie Piekos, founder of Bag-E-Wash, has another idea. She invented Bag-E-Wash, a product that allows you to wash plastic baggies in the dishwasher.

ArrowContinue reading: "Bag-E-Wash: Re-Use Plastic Baggies"

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

April 19, 2007

Comparing Rechargeable Candles

We wrote a few months back about Philips Aurelle Rechargeable LED Candles. Some twinkle for your next dinner party with the fire risk or messy melted wax. Well, since Philips introduced the Aurelle candles, we've come across a few other brands worth noting:

Viatek Rechargeable Candles
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Sold in a six pack for $25, the candles (pictured at right) are the best deal we've found for LED rechargeable candles. The energy-efficient LED is a power saver -- each charge lasts for 12 hours.

The candles come with a 4.25" x 2.25" glass votive. The LED flickers just like a real candle. You see these in a lot of restaurants these days.

Buy Viatek rechargeable candles.


Brookstone's Flameless Wax Sensor Candles
B000EXUZSU.01-A31C4SAW3YCWWJ._SCLZZZZZZZ_V45608783_AA280_.jpgMade of real wax, these candles (pictured left) operate on four AA batteries - we recommend you use rechargeable ones. Not LED so not the most energy-efficient choice, though the candles do go out after two hours of use to save energy.

At $50, one of the priciest options. On the other hand, they look more natural than some of the LED versions. And they smell like vanilla. Buy Brookstone's Flameless Wax Sensor Candles.


Philips Aurelle LED Rechargeable Candles
B0009WRJ5S.01._SCMZZZZZZZ_AA160_.jpgPhilips Aurelle LED models, pictured at right, are also expensive, at $15 for an individual candles or $200 for a 10-pack. Charge lasts 10 hours. Lights twinkle invitingly.

Philips rechargeable LED candles also come in different shapes, including square, round, triangle and tulip.


Sharper Image Waxless LED Flameless Candle
B000GGUYIG.01-AFK4B2ETLE86K._SCMZZZZZZZ_V24029417_AA160_.jpgAt $20, this wax LED candle (pictured at left) uses 2 C batteries for a life of up to 350 hours. Not too shabby. And good looking, too.

Again, make sure you pick up rechargeable batteries, please. Buy the Sharper Image Waxless LED Flameless Candle.

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

April 16, 2007

Thomas Friedman's Geo-Green Strategy

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Having effectively demonstrated that The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman is campaigning for energy independence. His cover article in this Sunday's New York Times makes the case that "going green" is the key to putting "our post-9/11 trauma and the divisiveness of the Bush years" behind us, that it will "reknit America at home, reconnect America abroad and restore America to its natural place in the global order — as the beacon of progress, hope and inspiration." ArrowContinue reading: "Thomas Friedman's Geo-Green Strategy"

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

April 11, 2007

EZ Bag Compact Grocery Bags

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Tired of the paper or plastic dilemma? Get yourself an EZ Bag.

We were at a dinner party at Julie and Patrick's house on Friday. Another couple at the party regaled us with their plans for a green wedding this fall in Colorado. Among the items on their must-have list? Recycled paper invitations, a LEED-certified location, and EZ Bags for everyone.

Wait a minute, you say. What are EZ Bags? I'm glad you asked.

ArrowContinue reading: "EZ Bag Compact Grocery Bags"

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

March 19, 2007

Eco-Friendly Toilets: Waste Not, Want Not

18green.1901.jpgAmerican flush away nearly 4.8 billion gallons of water every day, accounting for nearly 40% of our total indoor water consumption. Turns out toilets are "a big player" for homeowners interested in going green, according to author Florence Williams.

Writing in this Sunday's New York Times, Williams describes "the latest in eco-friendly elimination" -- from waterless urinals to superlow-flush toilets. She discusses her own experience with the Sun-Mar nonelectric composting toilet.

I didn’t want anything to do with it at first. The idea of human waste sitting in one spot — right next to you — for months at a time is difficult to stomach, but I had little choice. Our solar-powered summer cabin has limited running water and soils that are too shallow for a septic system.
ArrowContinue reading: "Eco-Friendly Toilets: Waste Not, Want Not"

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

March 1, 2007

LED Lamps Infinity Flat Head Floor Lamp

B000LBXH7Q.01-A8METEVCB05GJ._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_-1.jpgYou light up my life. Or the room at least.

The Infinity Flat Head Floor Lamp contains 20 LEDs, but uses only 2-watts of electricity. We like its minimalist look, not to mention its energy efficiency.

According to the blurb on Amazon, the LEDs on these lamps never have to be replaced, saving you time, money and storage space. Plus, the LEDs use a fraction of the power (80-90%) required by conventional filament bulbs.

Infinity Flat Head Floor Lamps available at Amazon.

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

February 28, 2007

EESUs Make Electric Cars Easier to Own

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Ever thought about owning an electric car? For anyone who's nixed the idea because of the 5-6 hours it takes to re-charge batteries on long trips, Texas-based company EEStor has some good news.

The company manufactures the EEStor ultra-capacitor (or EESU), a quicker-to-charge, lightweight battery that is faster to charge and easier to use than regular lithium-ion batteries. And unlike lithium-ion batteries, EESUs can be charged and recharged over and over without losing life.

ArrowContinue reading: "EESUs Make Electric Cars Easier to Own"

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

February 22, 2007

Treehugger: Vegetarianism is the New Prius

veg prius-thumb.jpgHe's not the only one to notice, but Lloyd Alter, writing for Treehugger, says it best, referring to Kathy Freston's article on Alternet about new UN reports on livestock and the environment:

With warnings about global warming reaching feverish levels, many are having second thoughts about all those cars. It seems they should instead be worrying about the chickens.

Read Alter's blurb at Treehugger.

Read Freston's article on Alternet.

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

January 31, 2007

Which Firewood Burns Cleanest

umbra.gifAfter our article a couple weeks ago on True Fuel's new renewable, eco-friendly firewood made from sawdust, we were intrigued to read Grist's Ask Umbra column on "Which Wood to Burn."

In response to a reader's question re: how to reduce smoke and pollutants coming from chimney's and woodburning stoves:

The short answer is: buy a dense wood, buy it split or split it yourself, and give it six months to a year to dry. Mayhap what you see in one chimney vs. another is smoldering, or wet wood, or variation caused by weather and stove type. What you want is a hot, efficient fire followed by well banked coals.

Read the whole story at Ask Umbra.

Jess Brooks at Permalink social bookmarking

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