October 6, 2012

Bitsy's Brainfood: Unique Snack Combinations Full of Omega-3 and DHA

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Are you looking for an interesting snack for you children that sneaks in flavors and goodness? Bitsy's Brainfood does just that in a pleasantly surprising way.

Bitsy's Brainfood was started by two new moms who shared a simple belief -- that healthy bodies and healthy minds are connected, and that learning to eat smart should be fun.

The fact is that certain foods are smarter than others. So the idea was to create Bitsy's Brainfood, a line of smart snacks... bite-sized treats packed with the good stuff to help support developing bodies and brains, like vitamins and Omega-3, and packaged with content that's educational and oh-mega cool. Plus, we've yet to meet a kid who doesn't love snacks or a parent who doesn't crave nutritious, on-the-go options.


We were sent a lunch bag with two flavors:

The packages of organic snacks are affordable ($2.50/box). The lunchbag and water bottle that accompanied our samples is very cheap. Even if BPA free, I wouldn't let my children drink from such weak plastic. The website, which is largely designed for children, is somewhat annoying. Furthermore, our samples were sent in an enormous box!  The snacks themselves are unique and a great way to get children a little extra nutrition between meals.

disclosure: The products described above were sent to us as free samples. Prior assurances as to the nature of the reviews, whether positive or negative, were not given. No financial payments were accepted in exchange for the reviews. The reviews reflect our honest, authentic opinions

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

October 2, 2012

Organically Grown AllGood Provisions Perfect for Healthy Snacking

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Looking for a quality organic snack? AllGood Provisions can keep you supplied with their eco-friendly packaging and affordable prices. We were sent two packets to try:

ALLGOOD is an original brand of organic, nutritious, and earth-friendly snack foods. Good, natural food, it's that simple.

ALLGOOD foods are certified organic and free from harmful pesticides, growth hormones, and synthetic fertilizers.

Each of our products contains rich vitamins and minerals important to a healthy diet. Good, natural nutrition from the earth.

At ALLGOOD we are continually exploring ways to reduce our ecological footprint and operate in an earth-friendly manner.

It is our firm belief that businesses have a responsibility to do their best to create positive social and environmental change. AlLLGOOD has been a proud member of 1% for the Planet since our inception.


I like how they say right on the packaging what state the food originates from boldly.


disclosure: The products described above were sent to us as free samples. Prior assurances as to the nature of the reviews, whether positive or negative, were not given. No financial payments were accepted in exchange for the reviews. The reviews reflect our honest, authentic opinions

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

September 21, 2012

Clif C Bars: 70% organic and all natural for healthy snacking

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Clif is synonymous with energy bars. Clif C bars are double-layered fruit and nut bar that looks delicious. Unfortunately, this is another box that got buried in the office, so these samples had expired before I could taste them.

Clif C Bars come in four flavors: blueberry, raspberry, apple, and cherry pomegranate.

NEW CLIF C is the first double layer fruit and nut bar
Using only a handful of ingredients, we lightly bake our bar, sprinkle it with nuts and add a hint of sea salt to make the flavors dance
Fruit, Nuts and Sea Salt - our dedication to the best nature has to offer
70% organic and all natural
One serving of fruit in every bar
Good source of fiber (contains 4.5g total fat
We source ingredients that are not made using gluten, soy, dairy or wheat
No trans fat, no GMO's
Certified Kosher
Vegan and vegetarian

They are currently unavailable on Amazon, and they are backordered on Clif's site.

disclosure: The products described above were sent to us as free samples. Prior assurances as to the nature of the reviews, whether positive or negative, were not given. No financial payments were accepted in exchange for the reviews. The reviews reflect our honest, authentic opinions
Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

September 20, 2012

Trans fatty acid putting millions of Europeans at risk

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I've always assumed Europeans ate healthier than Americans. I don't know why. Apparently, their diet is still full of "persistently high trans fatty acid content of certain fast and convenience foods", just like Americans. Science Daily reports:

While the overall TFA fat content of foods has fallen, few European countries have imposed any legal limits, meaning that it is perfectly possible to buy certain packaged and restaurant foods which still contain very high levels, say the authors.

Trans fatty acids (TFA) are primarily produced by the industrial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, a process that solidifies them and helps to prolong the shelf life of the baked goods in which they are used...

Clearer food labelling is one way of curbing trans fatty acid intake, but most countries still rely on food manufacturers to voluntarily reduce the TFA content of their products, the authors point out.

Only a few countries -- Denmark, Austria, Switzerland and Iceland -- have gone down the legislative route and forced industry to limit the amount of TFA used in foods to 2% of the total fat.

But foods containing trans fats, which can comprise up to 60% of the total fat content, can still legally be sold as shop bought packaged goods, or unpackaged in restaurants and fast food outlets elsewhere in Europe, the authors emphasise.


In the US, trans fat labeling became mandatory in 2006. New York city has banned it in restaurants. High consumption of trans fat leads to heart disease.

Image: License

Attribution Some rights reserved by basykes
Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

September 14, 2012

Low Acid Coffee for Sensitive Stomachs Endorsed by the Vatican

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I know several people that have had to give up coffee because their stomachs could not handle its acidic nature. This would be very tragic for me personally. I love coffee!

HealthWise 100% Colombian Supremo, Low Acid Ground Coffee and HealthWise 100% Colombian Supremo Decaffeinated are designed for people with sensitive stomachs.

Our coffee is produced using what we call the TechnoRoasting™ process. Starting with only the finest 100% Colombian Supremo beans, we roast a coffee that is like no other coffee on the market - low in acid, high in minerals and micro-nutrients, and high in yield. The coffee taste is not bitter. There is no harshness. There is no need to use creamers or sweeteners to mask the bitterness present in other coffees. Beyond that, due to the unique roasting process, the coffee can remain on a warmer much longer and still maintain its fresh taste....even be refrigerated and re-heated.
I am sorry dear reader, but I have not actually tried these coffees. I am a little worried, as they are preground (I like freshly ground in my kitchen), and I limit myself to one cup a day. I don't want to risk it! Plus, it is not organic. Perhaps I will try the decaf later and let you know.

Strangely, the packaging says it is endorsed by the Vatican. How do you get that endorsement?

disclosure: The products described above were sent to us as free samples. Prior assurances as to the nature of the reviews, whether positive or negative, were not given. No financial payments were accepted in exchange for the reviews. The reviews reflect our honest, authentic opinions.

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

August 28, 2012

Prop 37: California's Right to Know Ad

 

Who is behind the No on 37 campaign?

 

Monsanto

, the top contributor to No on 37 with $4.2 million in donations, was a primary manufacturer of Agent Orange, as was Dow Chemical, which has contributed $1.2 million to No on 37.


Agent Orange was the code name for herbicides used by the U.S. Military during the Vietnam War. U.S. soldiers were told that it was "perfectly safe" and often wore little protective clothing when applying it, as shown in our ad.

 

Agent Orange is now linked with various types of cancer and other diseases.


DuPont

, the second largest funder of No on 37 with just over $4 million in contributions, was the first major manufacturer of DDT.

 

DDT was marketed as "harmless to humans" but has since been linked to breast cancer, diabetes, reproductive disorders and other hazards to human health. DDT was banned in the U.S. in 1972 due to health and environmental concerns.


Tobacco industry operatives 

are key players in the No on 37 Campaign, including:

 

No on 37 consultants, MB Public Affairs, worked for Altria (formerly Phillip Morris Companies, Inc.).

 

Donations to No on 37 go to the law firm of Bell, McAndrews and Hiltachk. Thomas Hiltachk was a key operative in the tobacco industry's misinformation campaign in the 1980s and 1990s, and is also:

o   

Treasurer of the No on Prop 37 campaign.

o   

Architect of efforts to dismantle California's global warming law.

o   

Author of union-busting Prop 32 on the November ballot which LA Times columnist Michael Hiltzik described as the "fraud to end all frauds"

Also see: Big Tobacco Shills Trying to Stop GMO Labeling in California.

 

Henry Miller

 of the Hoover Institution, a lead spokesman for No on 37, has called for the reintroduction of DDT in the U.S. and is linked to atobacco industry front group that worked to discredit science on tobacco health risks.

 

Consider the Source: No on 37 is a Campaign of Lies

MYTH: "The World Health Organization, American Medical Association, National Academy of Sciences and other respected medical and health organizations all conclude that genetically engineered foods are safe."

 Henry Miller, Hoover Institute fellow, in an op-ed in San Francisco Chronicle and highlighted in a No on 37 press release issued Friday, August 24, 2012

TRUTH: None of these organizations has concluded genetically engineered foods are safe.

 The American Medical Association and World Health Organization/United Nations have said mandatory safety studies should be required -- a standard that the U.S. fails to meet. Numerous studies in the scientific literature suggest genetic engineering is linked to allergies and other adverse health effects. Despite these scientific warnings, the U.S. federal government requires no safety studies for genetically engineered foods, and no long-term human health studies have been conducted. 

National Academy of Sciences report concludes that products of genetic engineering technology "carry the potential for introducing unintended compositional changes that may have adverse effects on human health."

MYTH: Proposition 37 will raise the cost of groceries by "hundreds of dollars" per year.


TRUTH: Disclosing the presence of genetically engineered ingredients on food labels will not force food companies to raise the cost of groceries

. In a recent study of the economic impact of Proposition 37, Joanna Shepherd Bailey, Ph.D., Professor at Emory University School of Law, concluded: "Consumers will likely see no increases in prices as a result of the relabeling required." 


MYTH: Proposition 37 will "ban the sale of thousands of groceries"

 

TRUTH: Proposition 37 does not ban genetically engineered foods

; it merely requires that they be labeled with the phrase "Partially Produced with Genetic Engineering."

 

MYTH: Proposition 37 will result in "shakedown lawsuits."

 

TRUTH: Proposition 37 will enable consumers to make informed choices about the food we're eating and feeding our children. 

The lawsuits argument is a red herring. Food companies accurately label for calories, fat content and other information required by law; likewise they will abide by the requirements of Prop 37. According to a legal analysis by James Cooper, JD, PhD, of George Mason University School of Law, Proposition 37 is unlikely to result in frivolous lawsuits.

 

MYTH: Prop. 37 would prohibit processed foods from being marketed as "natural." 

 

TRUTH: Proposition 37 applies only to genetically engineered foods, not other foods. Processed foods such as canned olives could still be marketed as "natural" as long as the food is not genetically engineered. See legal analysis by Joseph Sandler of the law firm Sandler, Reiff, Young and Lamb. See more information about this red herring storyline. 

Via:  http://www.carighttoknow.org/

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

August 23, 2012

Make Your Own Soda Recipes: The Artisan Soda Workshop

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Sodas used to be homemade at local shops. These soda fountains offered unique flavors beyond the cola we are used to today. Now, thanks to Andrea Lynn, you can make your own unique, homemade, natural sodas.

The Artisan Soda Workshop: 75 Homemade Recipes from Fountain Classics to Rhubarb Basil, Sea Salt Lime, Cold-Brew Coffee and Much Much More is a cute little book that features many great recipes. At first, I was worried you needed a machine, like a Sodastream Fountain Jet Soda Maker, to use these recipes. Fortunately, no machine is required, but you can use one if you have one.

FLAVORFUL FIZZY SENSATIONS Craft amazingly delicious and stunningly creative sodas using natural, gourmet syrups you make at home. Nothing is more refreshing than soda. But why settle for canned carbonation when you can make your own delectable sodas at home? Artisan Soda Workshop shows you how to take soda to the next level by making flavors like:

• Apricot-Cinnamon
• Riesling and Raspberry
• Mango Chile
• Prickly Pear
• Fizzy Cantaloupe Agua Fresca
• Lemon -Thyme
• Plum Vanilla
• Cranberry, Orange and Ginger

With step-by-step instructions and colorful photos, this book's palate-pleasing recipes make it easy to create your own bubbly concoctions from exotic combinations of fruits, herbs and spices. These thirst-quenching drinks serve up parties bubblier, fill hot days with fizzy fun, and impress even the most discriminating of tastes.


These homemade sodas would make wonderful cocktails!

disclosure: The products described above were sent to us as free samples. Prior assurances as to the nature of the reviews, whether positive or negative, were not given. No financial payments were accepted in exchange for the reviews. The reviews reflect our honest, authentic opinions.

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

August 20, 2012

Reducing Beer's Water Footprint

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A cold beer on a hot day is many people's ideal for refreshment, but did you know it takes five times as much water as beer to make that beverage? Those five glasses of water would go a lot farther in hydrating you than the single bottle of beer.  What is the beer industry doing about it's heavy water footprint?

GreenBiz.com reports:

In recent years, most brewers have been using about a five-to-one water-to-beer ratio to make their beverages. But those figures are evolving rapidly. As water demand soars and supplies become limited, beer makers are rethinking their supply chains and sustainability goals. Two powerhouse companies -- MillerCoors and Heineken -- are focusing the best ways to reduce their respective water footprints. In its newly-released "Great Things on Tap" sustainability report, MillerCoors highlights some of its environmental stewardship and sustainability results. These include:

  • Reducing their water-to-beer ratio to less than 4:1 at five of their eight breweries..
  • Cutting water consumption by 100 million gallons per year at their Milwaukee brewery, through the use of a new cooling system that uses re-circulated water.
  • Saving 124.5 million gallons of water -- while increasing barley yields -- during the first year at its Showcase Barley farm.

We often don't consider the water footprint of the products we consume. Beer is just one example of how much water we consume beyond our home use.  As freshwater becomes scarce due to drought or higher demands on resources from growing populations, we will need to pay closer attention to water footprints.

Image:

Attribution Some rights reserved by DeusXFlorida
Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

August 18, 2012

Do we have to fund our schools with soda contracts?

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In these tough economic times, schools have resorted to contracts with soda companies to add to their budgets. In fact, 80% of public high schools have contracts with either Coke or Pepsi to sell their products on vending machines on campus.  

Mother Jones reports:

Starting in the early '90s, cash-strapped public schools began selling exclusive "pouring rights" to one or another Big Soda company, which would then supply all the beverages sold in on-site snack bars, stores, and soda machines as well as at sports events. Along with sugary drinks, of course, the companies also stuffed the schools with plenty of advertisements... The soda deals subsidize other aspects of schooling, too. Here's how the Rockford Register Star describes a contract between the Rockford, Illinois school district and Coca-Cola:

Under the existing 10-year contract, Coca-Cola paid the district $4 million upfront and an additional $350,000 a year to sell its beverages in schools. The annual payments have funded field trips, gym uniforms, SMART Boards and other frills that individual school budgets may not otherwise have afforded.

I don't know if our local public high school has such a contract, and I wonder if such contracts prohibit schools from promoting anti-junk food education? 

My children would not be tempted by such vending machines, but they are not the norm. With obesity rates on the rise, it is irresponsible to be underfunding our schools to the point that they need soda companies. What's next? Tobacco advertising?

Image License
Attribution Some rights reserved by SliceofNYC

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

Bravo Cookbook: No Sugar, Oil or Salt Vegan Recipes

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Are you trying to limit or eliminate SOS ingredients from your diet: salt, sugar, or oil? Bravo!: Health Promoting Meals from the TrueNorth Health Kitchen by Ramses Bravo is filled with vegan recipes.

The growing popularity of a vegan lifestyle is exemplified in the profusion of superb recipes comprising "Bravo! Health Promoting Meals from the TrueNorth Health Kitchen. A 160-page compendium of health-promoting and thoroughly 'kitchen cook friendly' recipes from the TrueNorth Health Center in Santa Rosa, California, ably compiled by executive chef Ramses Bravo, the dishes range from Coconut-Vanilla Granola; to Chayote-Apple Slaw; to Toasted Barley and Tomato Stew; to Peach-Blueberry Crisp. Enhanced with informed and informative opening chapters on 'Getting Started' and 'The Basics', Bravo will prove to be an exceptionally popular addition to personal, family, and community library Vegetarian & Vegan cookbook collections. --The Midwest Book Review - July 2012

There are some mouth watering photographs throughout the book, such as the mango banana pie. The photos are not placed right next to the text of the recipes, which I find annoying. The recipes are not hard, and I love that they avoid the SOS ingredients!

disclosure: The products described above were sent to us as free samples. Prior assurances as to the nature of the reviews, whether positive or negative, were not given. No financial payments were accepted in exchange for the reviews. The reviews reflect our honest, authentic opinions.

Jennifer Lance at Permalink social bookmarking

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